Hello and welcome to my quantum physical blog. I usually post science stuff, but I'll really post whatever I think is cool and interesting. I hope you enjoy your stay.

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe  10,007 notes
jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

Reblogged from sagansense  685 notes

sagansense:

spaceplasma:

Mars Orbiters ‘Duck and Cover’ for Comet Siding Spring Encounter

NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19.

The comet’s nucleus will miss Mars by about 82,000 miles (132,000 kilometers), shedding material hurtling at about 35 miles (56 kilometers) per second, relative to Mars and Mars-orbiting spacecraft. At that velocity, even the smallest particle — estimated to be about one-fiftieth of an inch (half a millimeter) across — could cause significant damage to a spacecraft.

NASA currently operates two Mars orbiters, with a third on its way and expected to arrive in Martian orbit just a month before the comet flyby. Teams operating the orbiters plan to have all spacecraft positioned on the opposite side of the Red Planet when the comet is most likely to pass by.

The European Space Agency is taking similar precautions to protect its Mars Express (MEX) orbiter.
  • For more information about the Mars flyby of comet Siding Spring, click here.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

That’s today. Here’s hoping none of our robotic emissaries take any damage!

Reblogged from cricketcat  1,986 notes

ohstarstuff:

What You Need to Know About Mars Comet Siding Spring

  • On Sunday, October 19th, Comet C/2013 A1, aka Siding Spring, will pass within about 87,000 miles of the Red Planet. The comet is between 0.5-5 miles wide.

  • The distance the comet will be from Mars is less than half the distance between Earth and our moon and less than one-tenth the distance of any known comet flyby of Earth.

  • Siding Spring most likley created in our outer solar system between Jupiter and Neptune around 4.6 billion years ago — just a few million years after the solar system formed. Scientists believe Siding Spring had a close encounter with one of these planets and was shot out into the Oort Cloud

  • A million years ago or so, a star passing by the Oort Cloud is thought to have bumped the comet’s orbit again, sending it on its current trip toward the inner solar system.

  • Comets from the Oort cloud are both ancient and rare. Since this is Comet Siding Spring’s first trip through the inner solar system, scientists are excited to learn more about its composition and the effects of its gas and dust on the Mars upper atmosphere.

  • NASA does not think the comet hit the Red Planet, but comets spew out a trail of dust and gas, and that could damage the fleet of spacecraft orbiting Mars. Just to be safe, NASA will move the Mars Odyssey orbiter, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and the new Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) to the other side of the planet as the comet approaches.

  • The Mars orbiters will take pictures and collect data on the comet as it flys by. Several Earth-based and space telescopes, including the Hubble Space Telescope, also will take pictures. Here is the full list of NASA assets observing Siding Spring

  • The comet was first discovered in January 2013 by Robert McNaught at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia.

  • Check out this great article from Space.com on how to view the comet from Earth 

Reblogged from droo-spooky  531,399 notes

marvelous-freeman:

fieldbears:

redvinesgiraffe:

democracykills:

swaggersbackto-theimpala:

I JUST REALIZED WE DON’T EVEN KNOW WHAT DINOSAURS SOUND LIKE! THEY COULD’VE BEEN SPEAKING FLUENT GERMAN FOR ALL WE KNOW

it’s too early for this late night tumblr shit

GUTEN MORGEN HERR PTERODACTYL

WIE GEHTS FRAU MASTADON

Oh my god neither of those are dinosaurs and there’s 145 million years separating them both, this post is a palaeontological disaster.

Mastodons aren’t dinosaurs, they’re mammals.

Reblogged from galaxyclusters  218 notes

zerostatereflex:

Is there life on Europa? 

HELL YEAH THERE IS! Well ok, maybeeeeeeeee not. Though given the odds I’d venture to say and bet just ONE of my eyeballs there is. 

WHY you ask? 

The above graphic shows us that the potential for life, where there is water, is pretty convincing. 

A nice comparison from the site: 

Earth
Diameter: 12,742 km
Average Ocean Depth: ~4 km
Volume: ~1.4 billion km3
Liquid Saltwater Surface Ocean
Earth’s surface is 29% land, 71% liquid water
Polar Ice Cap
Regional Liquid Salt Water Ocean
Rocky Sea Floor

Europa
Diameter: 3,120 km
Average Ocean Depth: ~100 km
Volume: ~3 billion km3
Liquid Saltwater Sub-Surface Ocean
Europa’s surface is covered in a global water ice crust/ Estimates range from 3 km - 30 km thick
Ice Crust
Global Liquid Saltwater Ocean
Rocky Sea Floor